What's in a (science) name?

What's in a (science) name?

Pumpkins and popcorn and planets and plastics - these are a few of teachers’ favorite things (on Newsela).

If you’ve spent some time browsing the site, you’ve probably come across your fair share of science articles and content. Science content is actually the most assigned by teachers of all levels - take a look below to see a sampling of their favorite science articles.

Article Headers
There really is a great pumpkin
Scientists study why popcorn pops
Between an iceberg and a hard place
There's no beach like home
Teaching bears, humans new tricks
Is "Planet Nine" out there?
Sea turtles munch on ocean plastics
Keeping dogs healthy, living longer
Fancy footwork to stay warm
One drought solution: Pacific Ocean

Given that science articles are so popular, we were curious: do students at schools with the word “science” in the name view more science articles than their non-science-named counterparts?

Both populations view science articles at the same rate, with science-named schools assigning at a rate of 24.1% versus 23.8% for non-science-named schools. Turns out you don’t need to have “science” in your school name to stoke interest in the subject - just access to a robust library of engaging, authentic, science-forward content.

We’ll be releasing insights from Newsela’s dataset on a weekly basis. Interested in what Newsela data can tell you about your school or district? Get in touch on Facebook or Twitter.

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